Bathing trunk nevus with multiple satellite lesions and neuroid proliferations

Authors

  • Shikhar Ganjoo Shree Guru Gobind Singh Tricentenary Medical College and Hospital, Gurugram, India
  • Nikita Gupta Junior Resident
  • Mohinder Pal Singh Sawhney Professor & Head of Department
  • Preet Kaur Junior Resident

Keywords:

Giant congenital melanocytic nevus, neuroid proliferations, satellite lesions

Abstract

Giant congenital melanocytic nevus (GCMN) are rare melanocytic proliferations of the skin. These may be associated with benign neuroid proliferations, lipomas and abnormalities such as spina bifida. Major concern with GCMN is risk of neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM), melanoma, or other complications. We report a case of a 4- year-old girl with an extensive hyperpigmented plaque that covered her entire trunk involving almost 50% of her body surface area, highly suggestive of a giant congenital melanocytic nevus. Multiple neuroid proliferations were present.  

Author Biographies

Shikhar Ganjoo, Shree Guru Gobind Singh Tricentenary Medical College and Hospital, Gurugram, India

Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology & STD

Nikita Gupta, Junior Resident

 Department of Dermatology & STDShree Guru Gobind Singh Tricentenary Medical College and Hospital, Gurugram, India 

Mohinder Pal Singh Sawhney, Professor & Head of Department

  Department of Dermatology & STDShree Guru Gobind Singh Tricentenary Medical College and Hospital, Gurugram, IndiaEmail: 

Preet Kaur, Junior Resident

 Department of Dermatology & STDShree Guru Gobind Singh Tricentenary Medical College and Hospital, Gurugram Email: 

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Published

2021-06-10

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Section

Case Reports